Archive for the ‘Talk Sex’ Category

Helen Samilou, famous for her bravery towards discrimination due to her status as living with HIV/AIDS has been awarded the Papua New Guinea 2008 Award for International Women of Courage. 

This remarkable woman has defied all odds and has come out publicly with her status. She not only told everyone about her status but she has gone a step further by advocating for People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and been a role model for many. Another guy, Peter Momo is also doing his part advocating and also warning people to be careful with their life.  

 

Helen was presented this award by Ambassodor Leslie Rowe in a closed ceremony held at the American Embassy on Wednesday morning. In attendance was Dame Carol Kidu, the first winner of the Award in Papua New Guinea.

Dame Kidu congratulated Helen but was ashamed the government of PNG did not do more for people like Helen and also was not present for the awards ceremony.

 

  Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 Launched  

Port Moresby, November 27, 2007 – The Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 will be launched at the Koroboro International School today. Youth groups and community organisations are encouraged to participate and submit their innovative proposals for community projects from all around PNG.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen held last year received a record number of 820 proposals from around the country. The theme of this year’s Kopetisen is “Kamapim Komuniti”. The Tingim Yut Kompetisen is a nationwide search aimed at finding and funding innovative projects for the benefit of PNG’s young people.

It is an initiative of the World Bank in partnership with Air Niugini, Bank South Pacific, Coral Sea Hotels, Digicell, Divine Word University, NASFUND, Pacific Enterprise Development Facility, Koroboro International School, and the French Alliance. 

The main objectives of the competition are to identify workable, ground-level ideas that will help address PNG’s key development issues and to assist small organizations to develop proposals and seek funding. The competitive process will identify local innovators and provide donors with potentially new avenues to work effectively at the grassroots. Ideas that work well will be publicized and may serve as successful models for use elsewhere.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen assessment process will include workshops to assist the finalists to fully develop their proposals. Through these workshops finalists will be encouraged to develop their skills in budgeting, project management, monitoring and evaluation etc.  There will also be displays of innovative ventures by young people who are already doing something within the community in Papua New Guinea.

A youth representative will also be a guest speaker talking about their experience as youth entrepreneurs . Proposals to be submitted to the World Bank and the closing date for submission of proposals will be Feb 29, 2008. The assessment of the submissions will take place in April 2008 with winning groups to be announced end of the month.

These groups will then be asked to nominate one person to attend a workshop at Divine Word University in Madang to develop more detailed proposals and learn about project planning and implementation. In early May 2008, a representative from all finalist groups will be brought to Port Moresby where they will display their project ideas at a public forum.

On the Award Day, a panel of distinguished Papua New Guineans will decide and announce the winners. Winning groups will have their projects funded for 12 months. To be eligible for consideration, recognized youth or community groups have to find partnering organizations then submit application that answers a set of questions about their project plans. 

For more information please contact:  Port MoresbyRex Paura 675-321 7111 Email: Rpaura@worldbank.org

Sex In Marriage

Posted: December 2, 2007 in Education, Health, Information, Talk Sex

Why are there so many divorce in Papua New Guinea?? Why are husband leaving their wife or wife leaving their husband? What is the cause for so many break-down in marriage? New couple weds…..you’d say “wow, this wedding is so perfect, this couple will be together till death do em’ part”. A year or two later….they couple separates and are with someone else. I have been muling over this delima for quite a while now…..

But I have come to a realization that maybe a lot of people in Papua New Guinea do not realise the magic of “Sex in Marriage” for a lasting relationships. I have vow to help young people, especially students to realise the importance of these issues and how it is all connected and inter-locked into HIV/AIDS if they are not carefull and take it for granted.

Anyway, I was reading a few blogs and I came across a message which I believe emphasis alot of message which I have been trying to get across and which I believe holds the key to lasting marriages. So let me cut & paste for you all to read.

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Sex according to Pastor Khathide (Ugandan)

A lot of people don’t associate sex with God – they associate it with Satan and darkness, as if sex weren’t holy. The bible is explicit when it comes to sex. Sex is holy within marriage, and there is no prescribed style.  

Nowhere in the Bible does it say that the missionary position is the only sexual style.

Not discussing sex in a relationship leads to divorce!!!!!. 

Pastor Khathide has counseled women who’ve complained: my husband treats me as if I were his brother. There was one who told him: I am tired of getting sex fortnightly, like a salary. Khathide told her she was lucky to be getting sex fortnightly, since some wives only get it on big days, like elections.  

Many husbands leave their wives to seek sexual pleasures in Hillbrow. Have you ever asked yourself what those wives have that you don’t. Wives have become very frigid and even sleep with their panties. If you’re a married woman, you should sleep naked and let your bum touch your husband.

Today you find men going out of their way to get a glimpse of a vagina. They page through magazines and even go to lingerie departments in stores hoping to see what’s hidden under panties, because their wives hide it from them.  Marriage is about being free with your body in front of your partner. A woman should parade naked and do some modeling to tempt her husband.

There are many married women who don’t know what their husbands’ penises look like. They only feel it when he enters her. They’ve never touched it, let alone see it, because the husband switches off the lights before undressing. A penis is a wife’s toy – she is supposed to play with it.  He blames couples for not making time for sex and complaining about being tired after a day’s work. You find many couples who’ve been sexually starved for years. God created sex for procreation and also for pleasure. You can’t marry and not have a good time in bed.  

WHO SAID YOU CAN ONLY HAVE SEX AT NIGHT?

Why can’t you drive home during lunch and have a quickie with your wife?

We’re all equal in sex – it’s not just about a woman satisfying a man. You have to satisfy each other. Have you ever seen a woman who has been satisfied? Have u noticed how she glows and becomes energetic?

May the Lord Bless you. This is the “Whole Truth, Nothing But The Truth” so God Help Us From The Beginning.  

Following the newspaper article about the husband ripping the baby off the wife’s womb….here is the respond from Mr. Ju the husband. It was on today’s courier.______________________________________________________________________________

She deserves to die: Hubby

ALLEGED wife beater Robert Ju says his traumatised wife, Toy Molly, is lucky to be alive.

Ju said the 20-year-old woman survived death, as the offence she allegedly committed warranted outright killing. Ju claimed the pregnant woman was one of two women raped at Kudjip tea plantations where her seven-month-old unborn baby was killed.

“She is lucky she’s still living today. In such cases (when a woman commits adultery or has been raped) she is axed to death and tribes go to war,” he said.

But she maintains Ju killed the baby by ripping it out of her womb.

Ju explained that in the Highlands custom, women, pigs and land were the major source of tribal conflicts as they remained valuable assets for a family or tribe. He claimed his partner had committed a terrible offence which was locally punishable by death.

But Ju says he was a good man who had forgiven his wife for her “crime”, adding he would welcome her back to live with him once she was discharged from the hospital.

However, Molly said she would live with her grandmother as she faced death.

The fugitive said the woman had initially provoked the beating and it was unfair for the police and community leaders to target him.

Police say Ju is still on the run and reiterated their call to villagers for co-operation in apprehending him to face charges.

Post Courier on Tuesday 2nd October reported a most bizarre story I’ve ever read. It was a case of most horrific inhumane behavior a human being (of which I am ashamed to call myself a human) could have ever done.

The story of a man beating his wife, putting his hand through her genitals and pulled out the baby. He then proceeds to pour hot water into her genitals and later forced her to go to sleep. I could not imagine the extent to which human beings can bring themselves to but this has sparked calls by various women groups and leaders to make a petition to the floor of the Parliament.

Let us all wear balck to work on Tuesday when Dame Carol Kidu presents her petition to the floor of Parliament.

“The second Post Courier article of today’s edition, also attached, recorded some of the reaction from the public condemning domestic violence,etc This incident is not an isolated one. There are many women and children out there who suffer this daily. As part of the need for the community at large to be informed of this cancerous behavior, and, which must be rid of, Minister Dame Carol Kidu, will be petitioning Parliament on Tuesday next week for proactive action to be taken against this sort of abuse. It has been proposed that a limited number ( as many as the parliament gallery will allow ) of people, men & women wearing black be in the gallery when Dame Carol is presenting the petition.”


Petition
Notes to the Petition:The Petition in relation to Violence against Women & children to be presented in Parliament on Tuesday in Parliament. It will be published on Monday’s Post Courier.

  1. That there is a general, pervasive feeling of dismay and helplessness about the increasing levels of violence in all sectors of society, particularly violence within the family which should be a safe haven for all people – women, children and men.We remind honourable Members of some recent horrific crimes : last week a young pregnant woman was repeatedly beaten by her husband who then forced his hand into her vagina and ripped the unborn child from her womb – she may survive but psychologically and emotionally she is scarred forever; three weeks ago a woman was chopped to death by her husband in Gordons market watched by Security Guards – nobody helped and now she is dead ; a few months ago a young girl was reportedly raped by 30 men; in November last year Josephine was tortured for days – burnt with hot stones etc etc by her husband and died after this horrific ordeal; recently an innocent woman was attacked by her drunk husband who chopped her left wrist causing it to hang off. As she reached out to hold the chopped wrist the husband then slashed her right elbow cutting off the main tendon and nerve system then slashed her across the right shoulder blade also cutting off the main tendon. She is now unable to go to work and is unable to feed herself nor do anything as the injuries sustained have disabled her for life.Sadly, these horrific crimes are occurring on a daily basis somewhere in PNG – many of them are never recorded and never reported but we all know they are happening.
  2. We, as concerned citizens, acknowledge that governments over the last ten years have made significant progress with legislative and policy reforms in the social sector but we are concerned that the implementation of these reforms needs far greater commitment from both government and civil society.

Your Petitioners therefore humbly pray that:

  1. The problem of violence in families and society at large be treated as a matter of national importance by this, the eight National Parliament, and we call on each Member of Parliament to make a personal commitment to advocate against and take action against violence in their electorates, particularly violence against women and children.
  2. The government provides the necessary financial and technical support to complete the work presently in progress with the drafting of the Family Protection Bill and for each member of this Parliament to provide leadership to ensure that the citizens of this country have their rights protected as stated in our Constitution, laws and international agreements.
  3. The government forms partnership with key stakeholders including ngos, faith based organizations, business community, educational entities, relevant statutory government authorities and donor partners to ensure affirmative action against violence.
  4. The government provides resources to enhance the capacity of responsible government agencies to implement existing laws to protect women and children.
  5. The government establishes additional facilities and improve existing Family Support Centres to provide care and support to women and children who experience violence, abuse and exploitation.
  6. The government institutes a register to record all instances of family and gender-based violence at hospitals, clinics and care centres run by non-government organizations and churches to be used as a basis of planning preventative and support measures.

And your Petitioners, as in duty bound will ever pray.

A year ago, I had the opportunity to attend the launching of the World Development Report for 2007 in Singapore. This launching coincided with the IMF/World Bank annual meeting for the year 2007. The Report was focused on young people and is titled Development and the Next Generation. This particular report is interesting as it recognizes the importance of young people and encourages governments to invest in youths.

What is World Development Report?
The World Bank’s annual World Development Report (WDR) is an invaluable guide to the economic, social and environmental state of the world today. Each year the WDR provides in depth analysis of a specific aspect of development. Past reports have considered such topics as the role of the state, transition economies, labor, infrastructure, health, the environment, and poverty. The reports are the Bank’s best-known contribution to thinking about development.
World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation.
So why is the World Bank interested in young people? Two simple reasons

Reason One

  • “There’s never been a better time than now for countries to invest in the next generation”

  • There has been an enormous progress over the past 30 years in terms of education world wide and the decrease in infant mortality

  • But this progress brings further challenges such as, “Are there enough jobs? Does the education prepare us for the daily lives? We encourage more primary education, but what about secondary education?”

Reason Two

  • We have the largest Youth Bulge ever

  • The youth bulge in the population pyramid due to decreasing fertility rate and growing aging population

  • Falling fertility rate leads to lower demographic dependence (a lot more working population) however this dependence will increase eventually in some countries due to the aging population.

  • Policies and institution matters- human capital and skills development

  • Which paths do developing countries follow?

The 2007 Report: Development and the Next Generation uses five transitional stages that youths go through in life and uses those transitional phase to find gaps for investment. These transitional stages are: Going to School, Staying healthy, finding a Job, Leaving home & starting a family and Exercising citizenship.

According to the World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation, developing countries which invest in better education, healthcare, and job training for their record numbers of young people between the ages of 12 and 24 years of age, could produce surging economic growth and sharply reduced poverty.

With 1.3 billion young people now living in the developing world-the largest-ever youth group in history-the report says there has never been a better time to invest in youth because they are healthier and better educated than previous generations, and they will join the workforce with fewer dependents because of changing demographics.

“Such large numbers of young people living in developing countries present great opportunities, but also risks,” says François Bourguignon, the World Bank’s Chief Economist and Senior Vice President for Development Economics.

“The opportunities are great, as many countries will have a larger, more skilled labor force and fewer dependents. But these young people must be well-prepared in order to create and find good jobs.”

The World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation use three lenses to look at social issues affecting young people around the world. Expanding Opportunity, Enhancing Capacities and providing Second Chances.

  • Opportunity to build skills and safe guard them e.g. education, relevance of the education system.

  • Opportunity to be heard, positive ways to make that mark e.g. Brazil’s consultation with youth before policies are made

  • Is there support for young people to help them make right choices? E.g. In Bangladesh there are bank accounts in the names of girls as they were willing to study and remain unmarried until they do so this has helped increase the enrolment rate of girls in terms of education. It was very successful.

  • Second chances to allow young people to get back on track and recover

  • To ensure that there are no parallel system for those who have succeed and those who fail.

  • Restoration rather than retribution

“Most developing countries have a short window of opportunity to get this right before their record numbers of youth become middle-aged, and they lose their demographic dividend. This isn’t just enlightened social policy. This may be one of the profound decisions a developing country will ever make to banish poverty and galvanize its economy,” says Emmanuel Jimenez, lead author of the report, and Director of Human Development in the World Bank’s East Asia and the Pacific Department.

Last time I wrote something about the Youth Coalition and what they are doing. Anyway, the same Youth Coalition is holding a Pacific Youth Advocacy Training at Nadi, Fiji in December 5th – 9th 2007.

So what really is the Youth Coalition??

YC is an international organization of young people between the ages of 15 & 29 committed to promoting youth sexual and reproductive rights at the national, regional and international levels. We are students, researchers, volunteers, educators, and activists.

The Youth Coalition envisions a world where the diversities of all young people are respected and celebrated, and where they are empowered and supported to fully and freely exercise their sexual and reproductive rights.

We believe that sexual and reproductive rights are human rights, and therefore apply equally to young people. As young people, we have a valuable contribution to make to society and must be given a voice in all policy and decision-making processes that is respected and fully incorporated.
The Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights (YC) is an international network of like-minded young advocates (aged 15-29) who are promoting sexual and reproductive rights of young people internationally. They are students, researchers, volunteers, educators, NGO (non-governmental organization) workers, and activists. The YC was formed during a meeting on the 5-year review of the United Nations International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD+5). Our activities are focused around three main areas: awareness raising, training, and information.

Pacific Youth Advocacy Training

The Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights is calling for applications to participate in training on sexual and reproductive rights, youth participation and advocacy. This 5-day training will bring together approximately 10 youth activists from the Pacific region. Participants will gain knowledge on the many aspects of sexual and reproductive rights and youth participation as well as advocacy tools to promote young people’s rights.

The application form for the training is attached. The YC is keen to receive applications from young people who:

· Fall between the ages of 15 – 29
· Have basic knowledge in the area of sexual and reproductive health and rights or another related field (i.e. gender equity, HIV/AIDS, youth participation, trafficking of young women, sexual orientation etc.).
· Are affiliated with an organisation/have some experience in working in the area of sexual and reproductive right or another related field (i.e. youth sexual health clinic, studies in related field, political work on youth issues etc.).
· Have a working knowledge of English AND can communicate proficiently in English with other training participants.
· Youth from the Pacific Islands and indigenous youth from Australia and New Zealand.

Please note that only those who fit the above criteria will be considered.

The 8th International Conference on Aids in Asia and the Pacific came to an end on the 23rd of August 2007. The conference hosts skills building workshops, planetary sessions and discussions on Aids in the Asia Pacific Region.

While there was 19 plenary speakers one only slot was allocated to youths to raise their issues. This raised the concerns that young people are still being neglected and forgotten. Most people speak about issues of Aids, yet not many are doing anything to help the young people. The closing remark by Ari Laksman, a youth, during the 8th ICCAP summaries the ignorance of leaders and academics about youth and thier issues.

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*ICAAP YOUTH STATEMENT, August 23, 2007*
Delivered at the Closing Ceremony by Ari Yuda Laksmana
Good morning ladies and gentlemen.

On behalf of the youth who participated in the youth forum, I would like to make a statement.

I would like to ask young people in the room who participated in the Youth Forum of the 8th International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific to please stand, and remain standing during my remarks.

To the rest of you who are seated, I have a question for you. What is it like to live in a world without AIDS? All the people standing were born after the pandemic. We do not know a world without AIDS.

We are already responding in our own ways to HIV/AIDS. We are running programs, educating peers, pushing for social change and uniting in this fight around the world.

The value of our response has to be recognized as necessary, and mainstreamed.
We strongly urge you to begin viewing us as equal partners in the response to HIV/AIDS and to move beyond the rhetoric of youth participation by funding youth-led initiatives, engaging in true youth-adult partnerships and meaningfully involving young people in policy that affects our lives.

Therefore, we have laid out concrete steps to be taken to ensure the next
ICAAP, held in my country of Indonesia, builds on the process started here over the next two years and beyond.

We call upon those present here today to work with us to achieve the following in the next two years in Bali:

1. More than double the number of youth participants;
2. Include youth voices by providing space for a youth representative at the opening and closing ceremonies, ensuring a platform for youth to address all congress delegates. Future congresses should include representation for young people, including young people living with HIV/AIDS, in the different segments of the congress programme to provide for the youth perspectives on the different issues;
3. Develop a separate scholarship selection process for young people that address problems that youth face when applying to conference of this nature;
4. Provide support for a youth committee comprised of members from the previous ICAAP youth forums to create a clear process of coordination, implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and hand-over of the Youth Forum;
5. Facilitate the meeting of youth at the Congress with high-level decision makers to advocate for youth-specific policy and to seek funding for their work;
6. Have a two-day youth pre-conference to discuss youth-issues of the region, network efficiently and adequately prepare youth to get the most out of ICAAP.
7. Technically and financially support the creation of a regional network of youth-run organizations working with youth.

Look around this room; what does that tell you about youth participation in this congress? Despite the fact that we comprise over half of all new infections, from the 19 plenary speakers at ICAAP, only “ONE” was a young person talking about youth issues.

For all the youth issues in the region and around the world, we had “ONE” chance to meaningfully address the entire congress had me speaking to you right now.

We were given only “ONE” day before the Congress to discuss, deliberate and strategize on all youth issues in all the countries that were represented here.

We stand firmly united against being tokenized on panels, relegated to abstract sessions and poster presentations, and denied funding to carry out our initiatives.

We hope that at the next ICAAP, we will not have to stand before you raising the same issues we are forced to raise again and again. We all know we need a great deal of CHANGE in the way we respond to AIDS in our region.

Many people think SOMEONE is doing something about the needs and concerns of youth and youth involvement; I did too until I saw the reality.

Constructive ways to ensure the momentum and successes of the previous 3 ICAAP youth forums in Melbourne, Kobe and now Colombo are sustained and expanded upon have already been raised with key conference organizers.

We will do all in our power and effort to ensure that a clear structure for planning, implementing and handing over the future ICAAP youth forums and programs is actioned and supported in full partnership with ALL ICAAP stakeholders. We hope that you’ll make it to the table; we will be there, waiting for you.

It is our hope that one day when we ask the youth of the room to rise, they will be the ones who have known a world without AIDS.

See you in Bali.

*Statement composed by youth from Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India,
Australia, PNG, Japan and from the Global Youth Coalition on HIV/AIDS*

Helen’s Story is a documentary that has been aired on Emtv about an extra-ordinary woman who defies stigmatation and discrimination to “speak-out” and advocate on HIV/AIDS. This story airs tonight also on Emtv and while I have not seen the documentary, I have decided to interview Helen and do my own “Helen’s Story” for 3 minutes on youtube.

In this short video Helen encourages young people who are sexually active to use a “condom” for protection as their is no other alternative. “Once you have the HIV virus thats something you will live with the rest of your life…….and if you are going to have sex, please use a condom and there is no other way I can recommend to you”.

I meet Helen during a recent BAHA Masters Trainers workshop in Port Moresby. Helen is living with HIV/AIDS and works with Anglicare Stop Aids to advocate for those people who are living in AIDS and also to tell young people about the dangers of HIV/AIDS. Helen’s Story is very motivating for those advocating for PLWHA that they are also human and they should be discriminated because of the HIV/AIDS statues.

HIV/AIDS victims have the same rights to living and basis services as you and I and it does not matter what their status is. Discrimination must have no place in our society. If you have a relative that is living with AIDS, make sure you know how best to take care of them. Having basic knowledge on HIV/AIDS helps one to care for thier relative living with AIDS.

Youth Coalitions

Posted: July 3, 2007 in Education, Information, Talk Sex

There are alot of youth organizations around the world that is taking up the challenge of airing out youth issues and fighting for their voice to be heard. Some of these youth organizations specificly target certain social issues while others are broad in nature. Some of these youth organizations are donor fundered while others operate for a profit.

Yet…all these youth organizations have one thing in common. And that is to advocate for the rights of young people. Rights that are agreed on by member countries in the UN Charters and Conventions. Some of these groups are Global Youth Coalition on HIV/Aids http://youthaidscoalition.org/, Taking It Global http://takingitglobal.org/ and even international organizations like World Bank and United Nations have their own youth section with their department.

Now when I did a posting on Sex Education….I sent a link to GYCA http://youthaidscoalition/ so young people visiting GYCA website can also visit the Yu Tok Blog. Well, I got a quite few visitors and some of those visitors wanted me to write something about their activities. One particular oranization, Youth Coalition http://youthcoalition.org/ wanted to invite me to a Pacific Training. This training is about Youth Sexual Reproductive Rights and it will be staged in Fiji early November 2007.

The interesting thing to note about Youth Coalition is that, unlike most NGO youths they actually have an office and have staffs that are working on contracts. Their office is based in Canada, have a full-time staff on contract and most amazingly…they have annual reports. Now talk about being organized for a youth group…….but thats not the end….they also have sponsors and some of their sponsors are Ford Foundation, Dutch Government and anonymouse donors.

Youth Coalition stands for the following values and principles:

  • Sexual and reproductive rights are human rights, and therefore apply equally to young people.
  • All human rights are universal and must not be limited on the grounds of conflict with religion, culture or tradition.
  • Sexuality and sexual expression are integral parts of the personal identity of all human beings, therefore applying equally to young people.
  • Youth participation is essential to ensure that sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes and policies address the needs of young people.
  • Young people have a valuable contribution to make to society and must be given a voice in all policy and decision-making processes which is recognized, respected and incorporated.
  • Sexual and reproductive health and rights information and education are vital in safeguarding and promoting the life, health, and well-being of young people.
  • Sexual and reproductive health services are vital in safeguarding and promoting the life, health, and well-being of young people.
  • All women, irrespective of age, have the right to medically safe, legal and accessible abortions.
  • The sexual and reproductive lives of young people must be free of coercion or the threat of violence.
  • Funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes must meet the needs of all young people.

Now if you don’t believe me…..visit the site http://www.youthcoalition.org/ yourself and see it.