Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

 

Dear Readers

I have been neglecting this blog for a long time now…… gosh I can’t even remember when I last posted here.

The reason being that I have been working on a new Social Networking site in Asia Pacific Region. The social networking site is similar to Facebook, Bebo, Hi5, MySpace and the list goes on… What its great about this site… is that it is owned and run by me (yours truely) but also have moderators from over the Pacific Region.

Yu Tok Organization or Yu Tok Social Network is a growing social networking for Young people and those who are young at heart in Papua New Guinea and across the Asia Pacific Region.

The site has the following Features;

  • Discussion Boards
  • Chat Rooms
  • Groups
  • Videos
  • Music Site
  • iMagazine
  • iPaper
  • Games Arcade ( over 200 plus)
  • C31 – our new Partner in our quest for a community TV

From the day that I launced the website and till now here are my stats;

466 members 1557 photos
372 songs 77 videos
103 discussions 63 blog posts

Not to mentioned I have 10, 435 visitors from 59 countries.

And the amazing thing is people are signing up almost every day…..

So if you looking for a place to hang-out with wantoks or friends….. and wanting to create a network and meet people….check the site out.

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Following my post on the Tingim Yut Kompetisen on a national level, https://yutok.wordpress.com/2007/12/05/world-bank-launched-grant-competition/, the global competition is also calling for applications. It’s theme is on sustainable agriculture. I have copied and paste the information for you all to read.

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/OPPORTUNITIES/GRANTS/DEVMARKETPLACE/0,,contentMDK:21617862~pagePK:180691~piPK:174492~theSitePK:205098,00.html

What is DM2008? 
The 2008 Global Development Marketplace competition (DM2008) seeks proposals on the theme of Sustainable Agriculture for Development.Applications are accepted through March 21, 2008 and will undergo rigorous review by more than 200 development experts. About 100 finalists will be announced in June and will be invited to World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC in late September to vie for grants in person at the DM2008 Marketplace event.

This competition offers a unique opportunity to turn your innovative idea for sustainable agriculture in developing countries into reality. If selected, your idea could receive up to US$200,000 in grant funding for implementation over two years. Click here to review the competition brochure.

Proposals are welcome from all development innovators—civil society groups, social entrepreneurs, private foundations, government agencies, academia and the private sector. See the eligibility criteria for more details.

Proposals must address one of the following three sub-themes:

1. Linking Small-Scale Farmers to Input-Output Markets
Farmers are defined broadly to include those who make a livelihood through crops, livestock, agro-forestry, fisheries or aquaculture. Well-functioning agricultural markets can reduce the cost of food and uncertainty of supply, thereby improving food security for both poor and non-poor households. Better markets also result in higher net returns to farmers, derived from reduced post-harvest losses, lower transaction and transfer costs, access to a broader base of consumers and potentially greater value addition. By contrast, inefficient markets and institutional constraints impede growth and lead to welfare losses for smallholders, threatening their competitiveness and often their survival.

Linking small-scale farmers to better markets requires productivity-enhancing change at the farm level that will make their products more attractive to buyers in terms of quality, consistency of supply and price. It also requires institutional innovation in the marketing system that will reduce delays, costs, service gaps, information asymmetries that prevent both availing of opportunities and achieving better market trust and reputation. Ultimately such changes reduce risk.

Under DM2008, proposals for institutional and organizational innovation in marketing systems are sought primarily for: (i) financial and business development services that expand opportunities for more efficient technology adoption and resource allocation by small-scale producers and market agents; (ii) effective producer organizations that can reduce transaction costs and improve efficiency in the marketing chain; (iii) innovations that improve the access of small-scale producers and market agents to transport services, physical markets, telecommunications and electricity in ways that improve supply chain logistics; and (iv) improved sourcing and selling arrangements such as contract farming that will increase access to more lucrative value chains.

2. Improving Land Access and Tenure for the Poor
Land is the key asset for hundreds of millions of poor around the globe who work in agriculture. Land and the resources derived from it is the primary source of not only nutrition and income, but identity, wealth and credit access. Thus, the nature of rights to land and resources (including common property and aquatic resources) and the way in which they are documented and can be exchanged are key determinants for and sustainable agricultural development as well as improved livelihoods for those in the rural sector.

This sub-theme seeks out innovative, low-cost and scalable ways to strengthen access to and improve productive use of land by the poor, especially women. These include: (i) legal aid/awareness campaigns and increasing access to records of land and aquatic rights through private-public partnerships to enhance transparency and reduce corruption; (ii) local resource mapping and registration to develop and codify arrangements for effective use of common property resources in a way that benefits the poor; (iii) decentralized settlement of conflicting land claims in post-conflict settings; (iv) local negotiation to allow regularization of existing occupation by marginal or poor populations or access to land through implementation of reform legislation for land and aquatic rights, or through land markets; and (v) technical and other support to enable those received land through such mechanisms to make the most productive use of it.

3. Promoting the Environmental Services of Agriculture in Addressing Climate Change and Biodiversity Conservation

Agricultural development and environmental protection are closely intertwined. The reliance of agriculture, forestry and fisheries on natural resources means that they can create beneficial and detrimental environmental outcomes. The impact of these activities can be local (agriculture is often the largest water user, for example) as well as global (contributing, for example, up to 30 percent of greenhouse gases). Improvements in agricultural and forestry practices can thus have beneficial impacts at multiple levels: agriculture’s large environmental footprint can be reduced, farming systems made less vulnerable to climate change and agriculture harnessed to promote more global environmental improvement and produce gains locally as well. However, there are often trade-offs between local incentives and global goals.

This sub-theme seeks to elicit innovative systems that ensure local gains to battling the global environmental problems of climate change and biodiversity conservation. Innovations are sought in the following areas: (i) development and production of sustainable biofuels; (ii) methods to scale up payments to ecosystem services; (iii) increased local incentives and benefits to the poor in payment for environmental services schemes; (iv) enhancement of community-level adaptation to climate change in rural areas; (v) reducing the contribution of agriculture and fisheries to greenhouse gases; and (vi) sustainable use and promotion of biodiversity at the local level.

  • Key Dates 

    • March 21, 2008: Deadline for all proposals
    • June 23, 2008: Finalists announced
    • July 28, 2008: Finalists’ proposals due
    • September 24-25, 2008: Marketplace & Knowledge Exchange

 

Young People in Papua New Guinea are taking on a Social Media Course. Thanks to Media Snackers, Pacifikayouth, Youth Action for Change and Yu Tok Oragnization, these youths are being taugh basic media tools via an online training. This training course started yesterday, 13th February and will run for 5 weeks.

The facilitators from Media Snackers are based in Europe and the participants are in Papua New Guinea and Tonga. This is a first time for such a training program to reach cross borders and it defies time difference for young people. It all shows the desire to learn social media by young people.

The program was initiated & organized by Pacifikayouth (formerly Youth for a Sustainable Future Pacifika) who have been empowering Pacific youth for four years through initiatives such as the Pacific Youth MDG Summit in 2005, the Pacific Youth MDG Toolkit in 2006 and advisory roles to key development organizations on youth policy.

MediaSnackers, who are coordinating the training with partners from the UK, Germany and Italy will focus on empowering the participants to think about sharing their local stories to a global audience. MediaSnackers Founder said. “It’s an honor to be involved in a such a unique project. Nothing like this has ever been done before and we’re looking forward to seeing, reading, watching and hearing the content which is going to be produced.”

The program is facilitated through the innovative online learning portal developed by Youth Action for Change who have won several global awards for their pioneering work.In Port Moresby, these enthusiastic youths took to the task in their first course and that was to create a weblog. “I am so excited about this blog course. I want to type and type and write about everyday stuff” says Everlyn. Other media tools and softwares to be taught and be used in the course are;– Skype
– Wikis
– YouTube
– Weblogs
– Flickr
– Podcasting/vodcasting

kevin-rudd.jpg

 

“Today we honour the Indigenous peoples of this land, the oldest continuing cultures in human history.

 

We reflect on their past mistreatment.

 

We reflect in particular on the mistreatment of those who were stolen generations – this blemished chapter in our nation’s history.

 

The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page in Australia’s history by righting the wrongs of the past and so moving forward with confidence to the future.

 

We apologise for the laws and policies of successive Parliaments and governments that have inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians.

 

We apologise especially for the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, their communities and their country.

 

For the pain, suffering and hurt of these stolen generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.

 

To the mothers and the fathers, the brothers and the sisters, for the breaking up of families and communities, we say sorry.

 

And for the indignity and degradation thus inflicted on a proud people and a proud culture, we say sorry.

 

We the Parliament of Australia respectfully request that this apology be received in the spirit in which it is offered as part of the healing of the nation.

 

For the future we take heart; resolving that this new page in the history of our great continent can now be written.

 

We today take this first step by acknowledging the past and laying claim to a future that embraces all Australians.

 

A future where this Parliament resolves that the injustices of the past must never, never happen again.

 

A future where we harness the determination of all Australians,

Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to close the gap that lies between us in life expectancy, educational achievement and economic opportunity.

 

A future where we embrace the possibility of new solutions to enduring problems where old approaches have failed.

 

A future based on mutual respect, mutual resolve and mutual responsibility.

 

A future where all Australians, whatever their origins, are truly equal partners, with equal opportunities and with an equal stake in shaping the next chapter in the history of this great country, Australia “

 

 – Kevin Rudd, Prime Mininster of Australia

The Bank of Papua New Guinea (BPNG) is concerned increasing fuel prices could trigger inflationary pressures in the economy.

 

Speaking in the bank’s Spetember 2007 quarterly economic bulletin published recently, PNG Governor Wilson Kamit said whole the country’s macroeconomic conditions generally remained favourable the fuel prices increase was a concern.

 

He added that the Somare government large fiscal surplus and an increase in government-operated trust accounts could also affect the price of basic goods.

 

What strikes me interesting was that the Governor of Central Bank did not raise any issues when the Somare Government increased funding. Almost everyone was all taking it with much appreciation and no one was concerned.

 

I remember about the same time, I made a posting ‘Is there too much money in the economy?” to caution the government about the possibility of “Cost-pull” inflation. It too the good Governor at least 4 months to realize the effect of the surplus budget. I think the Governor should wake up and start acting instead of reacting.

Honorable Minister for Community Development, Dame Carol Kidu officially launched the new website for the Department in a low key ceremony at the Lamana Hotel last month. This website marks the effort of the secretary for the Department, Mr. Joseph Klapat and the Minister to promote the Department of Community Development.

During the launching of the website, the Minister thanks UNICEF, UN and UNIFEM for their continued support towards children, women and youths and to promote the activities of the Department. UNIFEM has approved funding of US300, 000.00 to the Department of Community Development for projects to address the issue of Violence Against Women and to make sure CEDAW is implemented in Papua New Guinea. 

The site also contains links to various documents that people may be interested in getting a copy. For instance, a copy of the Birth Registration Form can also be downloaded and filled in to email to the Department to avoid the hassle of long cues and empty office at times.

 

  Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 Launched  

Port Moresby, November 27, 2007 – The Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 will be launched at the Koroboro International School today. Youth groups and community organisations are encouraged to participate and submit their innovative proposals for community projects from all around PNG.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen held last year received a record number of 820 proposals from around the country. The theme of this year’s Kopetisen is “Kamapim Komuniti”. The Tingim Yut Kompetisen is a nationwide search aimed at finding and funding innovative projects for the benefit of PNG’s young people.

It is an initiative of the World Bank in partnership with Air Niugini, Bank South Pacific, Coral Sea Hotels, Digicell, Divine Word University, NASFUND, Pacific Enterprise Development Facility, Koroboro International School, and the French Alliance. 

The main objectives of the competition are to identify workable, ground-level ideas that will help address PNG’s key development issues and to assist small organizations to develop proposals and seek funding. The competitive process will identify local innovators and provide donors with potentially new avenues to work effectively at the grassroots. Ideas that work well will be publicized and may serve as successful models for use elsewhere.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen assessment process will include workshops to assist the finalists to fully develop their proposals. Through these workshops finalists will be encouraged to develop their skills in budgeting, project management, monitoring and evaluation etc.  There will also be displays of innovative ventures by young people who are already doing something within the community in Papua New Guinea.

A youth representative will also be a guest speaker talking about their experience as youth entrepreneurs . Proposals to be submitted to the World Bank and the closing date for submission of proposals will be Feb 29, 2008. The assessment of the submissions will take place in April 2008 with winning groups to be announced end of the month.

These groups will then be asked to nominate one person to attend a workshop at Divine Word University in Madang to develop more detailed proposals and learn about project planning and implementation. In early May 2008, a representative from all finalist groups will be brought to Port Moresby where they will display their project ideas at a public forum.

On the Award Day, a panel of distinguished Papua New Guineans will decide and announce the winners. Winning groups will have their projects funded for 12 months. To be eligible for consideration, recognized youth or community groups have to find partnering organizations then submit application that answers a set of questions about their project plans. 

For more information please contact:  Port MoresbyRex Paura 675-321 7111 Email: Rpaura@worldbank.org

Sex In Marriage

Posted: December 2, 2007 in Education, Health, Information, Talk Sex

Why are there so many divorce in Papua New Guinea?? Why are husband leaving their wife or wife leaving their husband? What is the cause for so many break-down in marriage? New couple weds…..you’d say “wow, this wedding is so perfect, this couple will be together till death do em’ part”. A year or two later….they couple separates and are with someone else. I have been muling over this delima for quite a while now…..

But I have come to a realization that maybe a lot of people in Papua New Guinea do not realise the magic of “Sex in Marriage” for a lasting relationships. I have vow to help young people, especially students to realise the importance of these issues and how it is all connected and inter-locked into HIV/AIDS if they are not carefull and take it for granted.

Anyway, I was reading a few blogs and I came across a message which I believe emphasis alot of message which I have been trying to get across and which I believe holds the key to lasting marriages. So let me cut & paste for you all to read.

——————————————————————————————————————-

Sex according to Pastor Khathide (Ugandan)

A lot of people don’t associate sex with God – they associate it with Satan and darkness, as if sex weren’t holy. The bible is explicit when it comes to sex. Sex is holy within marriage, and there is no prescribed style.  

Nowhere in the Bible does it say that the missionary position is the only sexual style.

Not discussing sex in a relationship leads to divorce!!!!!. 

Pastor Khathide has counseled women who’ve complained: my husband treats me as if I were his brother. There was one who told him: I am tired of getting sex fortnightly, like a salary. Khathide told her she was lucky to be getting sex fortnightly, since some wives only get it on big days, like elections.  

Many husbands leave their wives to seek sexual pleasures in Hillbrow. Have you ever asked yourself what those wives have that you don’t. Wives have become very frigid and even sleep with their panties. If you’re a married woman, you should sleep naked and let your bum touch your husband.

Today you find men going out of their way to get a glimpse of a vagina. They page through magazines and even go to lingerie departments in stores hoping to see what’s hidden under panties, because their wives hide it from them.  Marriage is about being free with your body in front of your partner. A woman should parade naked and do some modeling to tempt her husband.

There are many married women who don’t know what their husbands’ penises look like. They only feel it when he enters her. They’ve never touched it, let alone see it, because the husband switches off the lights before undressing. A penis is a wife’s toy – she is supposed to play with it.  He blames couples for not making time for sex and complaining about being tired after a day’s work. You find many couples who’ve been sexually starved for years. God created sex for procreation and also for pleasure. You can’t marry and not have a good time in bed.  

WHO SAID YOU CAN ONLY HAVE SEX AT NIGHT?

Why can’t you drive home during lunch and have a quickie with your wife?

We’re all equal in sex – it’s not just about a woman satisfying a man. You have to satisfy each other. Have you ever seen a woman who has been satisfied? Have u noticed how she glows and becomes energetic?

May the Lord Bless you. This is the “Whole Truth, Nothing But The Truth” so God Help Us From The Beginning.  

 http://www.thenational.com.pg/112107/Nation%201.htm

By ISAAC NICHOLAS
THE majority of workers in the country will find more money to spend in their pay packets after the Government announced tax relief in the 2008 Budget.

Treasury and Finance Minister Patrick Pruaitch yesterday unveiled a record K8.9 billion money plan for 2008, which included tax relief for both workers and businesses.

Handing down the 2008 Budget, “Empowering the people of Papua New Guinea”, in Parliament yesterday afternoon, Mr Pruaitch said personal income tax threshold had been increased from K6,600 to K7,000.
He also announced a reduction in marginal rate of income tax from 25%-22% for people earning between K7,000 and K18,000 a year.This means, for example, a worker earning K18,000 per annum or above would receive a tax cut of K430 per year.


Business will also get relief with the Government’s continued effort to address impediments to doing business by abolishing stamp duties on borrowings, bills of lading, incorporation of companies, and, insurance policies.In addition, the Government will abolish the debits tax currently collected by banks as a small charge on every debt they processed.
This will benefit business and workers who operate bank cards to draw cash or do transactions.
Civil servants, as a result of the new wages agreement negotiated with Public Employees Association, will receive a general wage increase amounting to more than K1,000 a year together with other non-monetary benefits.

The 2008 Budget provides for total expenditure and net lending of K6.99 billion or 35.5% of GDP.
This includes total recurrent expenditure of K3.636 billion or 18.4% of GDP and a total development expenditure of K1.88 billion. Personnel emoluments again takes out the bulk of the recurrent expenditure with K1.5 billion due to increase in school teacher numbers, industrial awards for health officers, superannuation contributions and increase in staffing.

According to the total Government expenditure, total payments including total expenditure and net lending of K6.99 billion, amortization K1.99 billion and loan repayment of K4 billion brings the total expenditure to K8.99 billion.

The Government announced a whooping increase of K3 billion to the National Budget to around K8.4 billion. This is a record breaking budget ever since impendence and it brings a smile to all ministers and members of the Parliament.

Each district has been allocated K10 million which was raised from K1.5 million to K3 million earlier this month. The K10 million for each district seems too good to be true and each district now is preparing to use this money as the next year budget will also be K10 million if the current government stays on.

While PNG is smiling, I am screwing my face behind this computer as my economic senses are being put to test here. I welcome the budget so much…..yet somehow I feel there may be a problem that could be creeping in if our financial planners are not careful.

The problem I see is “Demand Pull Inflation”. Now let me try as much as possible to explain it in a layman’s term. Demand Pull Inflation refers to increase in Inflation due to an increase in demand in the economy. Because there is a lot of money pumped into the economy to be used in a short period of time, there will be a shortage of goods or services to meet the demand. Now because too much money is chasing so few goods, the price of that good will increase.

According to keynesian theory, the more firms will employ people, the more people are employed, and the higher aggregate demand will become. This greater demand will make firms employ more people in order to output more. Due to capacity constraints, this increase in output will eventually become so small that the price of the good will rise

Example: A bag of rice cost K3 at a local village store. Suddenly, 10 villagers who earns money front up to the shop to buy the rice for K3, but since there are only 5 packets of rice available, not all 10 will buy it. And since the shop owner wants to maximize his profit, he will raise the price to K5 to meet the demand.

This is commonly described as “too much money chasing too few goods”. More accurately, it should be described as involving “too much money spent chasing too few goods”, since only money that is spent on goods and services can cause inflation. This would not be expected to persist over time due to increases in supply, unless the economy is already at a full employment level.

————————————————————————————————————-http://www.thenational.com.pg/111307/Nation%201.htm http://www.postcourier.com.pg/20071113/news.htm 

Govt to announce K8.4b budget

THE 2008 Budget is a whopping K8.4 billion, K3 billion more than the previous budget and a record-breaking money plan since Independence.
The budget was supposed to have been handed down this afternoon but has been deferred to next week due to problems associated with the frequent power blackouts in the city, according to Secretary for Treasury Simon Tosali.
Mr Tosali told the Post-Courier yesterday the power blackouts had caused the computer systems some technical problems which had affected the figures and needed information technology people to correct the fault.
He said the system was being worked on and it was hoped to have the budget ready for next Tuesday.
On November 6, Mr Tosali took out a paid advertisement in the Post-Courier advising of the Budget lock-up to be held today at 10.30am. In the notice, he also said there were to be only two representatives from each organisation and that no phone calls would be allowed.
The unofficial budget figure was released by Minister for Foreign Affairs and Wabag MP Sam Abal in Wabag on Friday at the opening of the Bank South Pacific’s new building in that centre.
Mr Abal announced there would be a K8.4 billion budget. The Somare Government’s 2007 budget was about K5.4 billion.
The director of the Institute of National Affairs, Paul Barker said the real budget for 2007 was K5.4 billion but the temporary borrowings increased it to about K7.7 billion after the supplementary budgets were handed down.
Mr Barker said the same may have been said with this figure where the actual budget may be around K5 billion but the temporary borrowings like last year may have increased the figure to that amount