Archive for the ‘Citizenship’ Category

According to WikiLeaks, Papua New Guinea was described by the US Embassy Officers and Australian Officers as “dysfuntional blob”

While this may impact PNG-Australia relations, I don’t think the PNG Government wants to worry about that at the moment. We all know the views from Australia and US will never change. Jumping up and down just because someone call me FAT will not change their views……I just must prove em wrong!

Similarly, the PNG Government shouldn’t burden itself on name callings but should conduct itself in high regards. Let children play their games of name-calling!

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Papua New Guinea’s public service was a “totally dysfunctional blob”, while its political institutions are incapable of producing leaders who would work in their nation’s interest, according to US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks.

Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare is painted as a leader who sidelines MPs with integrity and dishes out jobs to his favourites, including his son Arthur, whom he appointed a government minister.

In a cable dated April 2006, the US embassy notes that Sir Michael sidelined three of his most effective cabinet ministers, who could have been expected to resist irresponsible moves to pass out favours.

“To not mince words, the pork has hit the fan,” the cable said.

It said trying to getting business done in a lead-up to an election in PNG was “always hard”.

“Somare has freed himself from inconvenient checks on his ability to wheel and deal,” it said.

“These events just confirm that PNG’s political institutions are still a long way from producing national leaders with incentives to work in their nation’s interest.”

The cables also noted comments from Australian embassy officials in June 2007 who described generational change in PNG as a “false hope”.

“Other Australian officers described the PNG public service as a totally dysfunctional blob that is great at planning but appalling at implementation,” the cable added.

A July 2006 cable said PNG was steeped in traditional magic and ignorant of modern economies.

It said Papua New Guineans were easy marks for Ponzi schemes, which proliferated throughout the country.

It said with an election looming the politicians were “dusting off their bottles of snake oil”.

The cables said the government had presided over the closure of health centres and schools, the collapse of effective policing and a steady rise in crime but there would be little mention of this during the campaign.

“Instead the themes will be the ageless one of which clan/village can get its man into government and reap the benefits thereby.”

 http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8294107/png-a-dysfunctional-blob-us-cables

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Sir Michael Somare returns to Papua New Guinea today!

This is almost 3 months after he was hospitalized and given leave by Parliament to undergo and urgent medical procedure. Whilst Chief Somare was away the Parliament decides that there was a vacancy in the Prime Minister’s post and opted to elect a new Prime Minister. Peter O’Niel was chosen to fill the vacancy.

ESP now has placed a Supreme Court reference questioning amongs other things if there exists a vacancy in the Prime Minister seat and also if Parliament acted out of its rules by voting for a new PM on the same day instead of the next seating of the Parliament.

But Sir Michael arrives back today in the country because Parliament choose to seat earlier than expected. Rather than risked being removed from Parliament for missing 3 consecutive seating…… Sir Michael Returns.

It would be interesting to see what transpires on Tuesday…… obviously Sir Michael would head straight to the PM’s seat…..and I wonder what would happen. Will speaker Nape move him to the opposition??

Only time will tell……..can’t wait for Tuesday!!

 

 

 

It was 1:30 am in the morning…… and I have just camped under my tin-roof sacked at Tauram Beach in Port Moresby. Red-eyed from sleep, I rushed to put on my small generator so I can get a glimpsed of Hekari United in action againts Al Wahda in Abu Dhabi. Generator started and my portal TV switched on, I seached to find the correct channel to get EMTV. However, my wired-hanger antenna just couldn’t pick out the signal.

Disappointed, I resorted to text my friends who would be awake to watch the match on TV. Yes… found someone up… Thankyou David.. but no thankyou for the result of 2-0 before half-time.

Balloons deflated, a feeling of disappointment I walked into my little sack and just wanted to get some sleep and forget that Hekari was loosing and quietly hoping that Hekari would come back into the second half and turn things around. Hopefully if I go to sleep and get up in the morning to turn my computer on, i’d get a different result which would have made my entire week.

It was not to be……but one thing Hekari would have gone away with is the fact that they have seen football biggest stage. They would have now experience what is like to be competing againts the worlds best. And to be a force to be reckon with, they need to polish up on their act, play with their hearts and play smarter…

Hekari has made Papua New Guinea proud and certainly all of the Pacific Islands!!!

Helen Samilou, famous for her bravery towards discrimination due to her status as living with HIV/AIDS has been awarded the Papua New Guinea 2008 Award for International Women of Courage. 

This remarkable woman has defied all odds and has come out publicly with her status. She not only told everyone about her status but she has gone a step further by advocating for People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and been a role model for many. Another guy, Peter Momo is also doing his part advocating and also warning people to be careful with their life.  

 

Helen was presented this award by Ambassodor Leslie Rowe in a closed ceremony held at the American Embassy on Wednesday morning. In attendance was Dame Carol Kidu, the first winner of the Award in Papua New Guinea.

Dame Kidu congratulated Helen but was ashamed the government of PNG did not do more for people like Helen and also was not present for the awards ceremony.

kevin-rudd.jpg

 

“Today we honour the Indigenous peoples of this land, the oldest continuing cultures in human history.

 

We reflect on their past mistreatment.

 

We reflect in particular on the mistreatment of those who were stolen generations – this blemished chapter in our nation’s history.

 

The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page in Australia’s history by righting the wrongs of the past and so moving forward with confidence to the future.

 

We apologise for the laws and policies of successive Parliaments and governments that have inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians.

 

We apologise especially for the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, their communities and their country.

 

For the pain, suffering and hurt of these stolen generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.

 

To the mothers and the fathers, the brothers and the sisters, for the breaking up of families and communities, we say sorry.

 

And for the indignity and degradation thus inflicted on a proud people and a proud culture, we say sorry.

 

We the Parliament of Australia respectfully request that this apology be received in the spirit in which it is offered as part of the healing of the nation.

 

For the future we take heart; resolving that this new page in the history of our great continent can now be written.

 

We today take this first step by acknowledging the past and laying claim to a future that embraces all Australians.

 

A future where this Parliament resolves that the injustices of the past must never, never happen again.

 

A future where we harness the determination of all Australians,

Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to close the gap that lies between us in life expectancy, educational achievement and economic opportunity.

 

A future where we embrace the possibility of new solutions to enduring problems where old approaches have failed.

 

A future based on mutual respect, mutual resolve and mutual responsibility.

 

A future where all Australians, whatever their origins, are truly equal partners, with equal opportunities and with an equal stake in shaping the next chapter in the history of this great country, Australia “

 

 – Kevin Rudd, Prime Mininster of Australia

The Bank of Papua New Guinea (BPNG) is concerned increasing fuel prices could trigger inflationary pressures in the economy.

 

Speaking in the bank’s Spetember 2007 quarterly economic bulletin published recently, PNG Governor Wilson Kamit said whole the country’s macroeconomic conditions generally remained favourable the fuel prices increase was a concern.

 

He added that the Somare government large fiscal surplus and an increase in government-operated trust accounts could also affect the price of basic goods.

 

What strikes me interesting was that the Governor of Central Bank did not raise any issues when the Somare Government increased funding. Almost everyone was all taking it with much appreciation and no one was concerned.

 

I remember about the same time, I made a posting ‘Is there too much money in the economy?” to caution the government about the possibility of “Cost-pull” inflation. It too the good Governor at least 4 months to realize the effect of the surplus budget. I think the Governor should wake up and start acting instead of reacting.

Honorable Minister for Community Development, Dame Carol Kidu officially launched the new website for the Department in a low key ceremony at the Lamana Hotel last month. This website marks the effort of the secretary for the Department, Mr. Joseph Klapat and the Minister to promote the Department of Community Development.

During the launching of the website, the Minister thanks UNICEF, UN and UNIFEM for their continued support towards children, women and youths and to promote the activities of the Department. UNIFEM has approved funding of US300, 000.00 to the Department of Community Development for projects to address the issue of Violence Against Women and to make sure CEDAW is implemented in Papua New Guinea. 

The site also contains links to various documents that people may be interested in getting a copy. For instance, a copy of the Birth Registration Form can also be downloaded and filled in to email to the Department to avoid the hassle of long cues and empty office at times.

http://climateprogress.org/2007/12/16/bush-team-humiliated-by-papua-new-guinea-blinks-in-bali-sort-of/

http://yutokorg.ning.com/video/video/show?id=1719631:Video:1682 – watch video

London – At least that’s how they’re covering it outside the United States. Similar to how it was reported on British TV last night, The Toronto Star, in an article titled “U.S. backs down after needling” reports the game-changer at the UN climate conference was the remarks of the delegate from Papua New Guinea, Kevin Conrad:

“We seek your leadership. But if for some reason you are not willing to lead, leave it to the rest of us. Please get out of the way.”

Oh, snap! as Jon Stewart would put it were he not silenced by the writer’s strike. What happened next?

The conference exploded with applause, the U.S. delegation backed down, and the way was cleared yesterday for adoption of the “Bali road map” after a dramatic half-hour that set the stage for a grinding two years of climate talks to come.

Since no hard, near-term targets were agreed to, I’d still call the conference an utter failure, by any reasonable standard, given how urgent the climate problem is. But compared to expectations — and the painful reality of the richest, most polluting nation on the world working full-time to block everyone else from moving forward — it was a partial success. The world will continue to work together to develop a roadmap to a post-Kyoto agreement.

The utter disdain that the rest of the world holds our President, if not clear from the ovation for tiny Papua New Guinea’s smackdown, drips from the lead editorial in today’s The Independent, titled “The world gets the better of Bush,” which drops any pretense of British stiff upper lip:

Last week was the week, and yesterday was the day, when the world finally showed that it was terminally fed up with the simple-minded, short-sighted and self-serving outlook of George Bush. The moment came not, as it well might have done, amid the dust and bloody debris of Iraq or the torture and state terrorism of Guantanamo Bay, but in Indonesia’s lush and lovely Island of the Gods. And, appropriately, it came over climate change — the issue on which the “toxic Texan” first showed that he was going to put his ideological instincts and oil-soaked obstinacy over the interests of the rest of the world and of future generations.

Double snap! The rest of the editorial is worth reprinting, because it puts what Papua New Guinea did in diplomatic context, it has insight into Tony Blair’s failure, and it has implications for our Presidential election:

The mood had been building all week at the negotiations in Bali on a replacement to the present arrangements under the Kyoto Protocol which run out in 2012. For months the United States, and President Bush himself, had been insisting that it would not block progress. Spin-doctors were dispatched to assert, ludicrously, not only that the President was as committed as anyone to avoiding catastrophic global warming, but that the man who had spent years trying to destroy any attempt to tackle it had always really been on the side of the environmental angels. But once his hard-faced negotiators took their seats in the steamy conference centre at the Nusa Dua resort the pretence slipped away. They blocked virtually every constructive proposal put on the table, refusing any suggestion of concrete action by the US, while insisting that other countries do more and more. Ever since Bush first rejected — and set out to kill — the Kyoto Protocol, he had cited as his main objection its exclusion of big developing nations such as China and India. More recently he has indicated that the US would move if they took the first step. Sure enough, they came to Bali ready to take action on their own emissions — and still the US refused to budge.

It is simply not done in international negotiations for one country to single out another for criticism; it’s the equivalent of calling someone a liar in the House of Commons. But from early last week other delegations were publicly, unprecedentedly and explicitly blaming the US for the lack of progress. Worse, they were beginning to point the finger at President Bush himself, suggesting that things would improve once he was gone. That is the kind of humiliation reserved for such international pariahs as Robert Mugabe and Saddam Hussein. But even they were never subjected to the treatment that America received yesterday morning. When it tried, yet again, to sabotage agreement the representatives of the other 187 governments broke into boos and hisses. When Papua New Guinea told the US to “get out of the way”, they cheered.

The US buckled, as it has always done in international negotiations when it has been isolated. The same thing happened at the G8 summit in Heiligendamm, Germany, last summer, and two years ago in Montreal, when holding the Bali negotiations was unexpectedly agreed. That is why Tony Blair’s fatal flaw of constantly trying to let President Bush off the hook — while doing so much to raise the profile of climate change internationally — was so destructive. That is also why it is so deeply disturbing that an EU source told The Independent on Sunday that Britain had helped the US water down the Bali agreement after a phone call from the White House to Downing Street. We must hope, as Hilary Benn insists, that this is wrong. The last thing the country wants, or the world needs, is for us to have replaced the poodle with a Pekinese….

The full scale of the White House’s isolation and humiliation, and its consequences for the fading superpower’s standing around the world, needs to be understood by the presidential candidates of both parties.

 

  Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 Launched  

Port Moresby, November 27, 2007 – The Tingim Yut Kompetisen 2007 will be launched at the Koroboro International School today. Youth groups and community organisations are encouraged to participate and submit their innovative proposals for community projects from all around PNG.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen held last year received a record number of 820 proposals from around the country. The theme of this year’s Kopetisen is “Kamapim Komuniti”. The Tingim Yut Kompetisen is a nationwide search aimed at finding and funding innovative projects for the benefit of PNG’s young people.

It is an initiative of the World Bank in partnership with Air Niugini, Bank South Pacific, Coral Sea Hotels, Digicell, Divine Word University, NASFUND, Pacific Enterprise Development Facility, Koroboro International School, and the French Alliance. 

The main objectives of the competition are to identify workable, ground-level ideas that will help address PNG’s key development issues and to assist small organizations to develop proposals and seek funding. The competitive process will identify local innovators and provide donors with potentially new avenues to work effectively at the grassroots. Ideas that work well will be publicized and may serve as successful models for use elsewhere.

The Tingim Yut Kopetisen assessment process will include workshops to assist the finalists to fully develop their proposals. Through these workshops finalists will be encouraged to develop their skills in budgeting, project management, monitoring and evaluation etc.  There will also be displays of innovative ventures by young people who are already doing something within the community in Papua New Guinea.

A youth representative will also be a guest speaker talking about their experience as youth entrepreneurs . Proposals to be submitted to the World Bank and the closing date for submission of proposals will be Feb 29, 2008. The assessment of the submissions will take place in April 2008 with winning groups to be announced end of the month.

These groups will then be asked to nominate one person to attend a workshop at Divine Word University in Madang to develop more detailed proposals and learn about project planning and implementation. In early May 2008, a representative from all finalist groups will be brought to Port Moresby where they will display their project ideas at a public forum.

On the Award Day, a panel of distinguished Papua New Guineans will decide and announce the winners. Winning groups will have their projects funded for 12 months. To be eligible for consideration, recognized youth or community groups have to find partnering organizations then submit application that answers a set of questions about their project plans. 

For more information please contact:  Port MoresbyRex Paura 675-321 7111 Email: Rpaura@worldbank.org

 

Today, we are launching a national appeal the Halivim Wantok Disaster Appeal (the Appeal) to raise funds from corporate sector and the public at large for the Halivim Wantok Disaster Fund (the Fund) that will support disaster relief and restoration activities in Oro province and other affected areas in the wake of the catastrophic floods.

The Appeal is being launched today and will run for the next three weeks. The Fund will act as the collection point for both corporate and public donations.  The Fund will then disburse the monies collected to the most effective entities that are assisting the survivors of the Oro floods. 

The Fund is intended to have minimal administrative and overhead costs – most of these will be borne by in-kind support of corporate donors (eg. Toll-free numbers donated by Telikom PNG, advertising space donated by print media and radio stations, accounting services will be donated, etc).

The Fund will be kicked off by corporate donors and then public contributions.  It is intended that corporate donors with points of presence around the country will also agree to use those points of presence as collection points (eg. Telikom business offices around PNG, bank branches, etc) and employees of those companies will also assist in the fundraising drive. 

Governance of the Appeal and the Fund

It is important the fund be overseen by a Governing Committee that lends credibility, integrity, transparency and experience to the fundraising process.  It has to be a Governing Committee that the public at large has confidence in to make sure that their donations get used effectively to help the people. 

The Governing Committee will be chaired by Sir Rabbie Namaliu.  A former Prime Minister and a person of impeccable integrity and standing, both in PNG and abroad, and will lead the Governing Committee. 

If you are from a company or a group that wishes to make a donation, or if you would like to assist the fundraising drive, please contact either of the following –
Executive Director, Anthony Smare
Mobile: 6837531
E-mail
asmare@barrick.com
Executive Officer, Michaelyn Iewago
Mobile: 674 4630
E-mail:
miewago@kh.com.pg
Postal Address:
P.O.Box 851
Port Moresby  NCD
Papua New Guinea
Halivim Wantok Disaster Appeal
24 hour Toll-free number:

Telephone:   18003999
If you have money you wish to deposit, please deposit into the following account at the ANZ Bank

Bank:                    ANZ Bank
Account Name:     “PriceWaterhouseCoopers – Halivim Wantok Disaster Appeal”
Account number12916791