Archive for March, 2008

Helen Samilou, famous for her bravery towards discrimination due to her status as living with HIV/AIDS has been awarded the Papua New Guinea 2008 Award for International Women of Courage. 

This remarkable woman has defied all odds and has come out publicly with her status. She not only told everyone about her status but she has gone a step further by advocating for People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and been a role model for many. Another guy, Peter Momo is also doing his part advocating and also warning people to be careful with their life.  

 

Helen was presented this award by Ambassodor Leslie Rowe in a closed ceremony held at the American Embassy on Wednesday morning. In attendance was Dame Carol Kidu, the first winner of the Award in Papua New Guinea.

Dame Kidu congratulated Helen but was ashamed the government of PNG did not do more for people like Helen and also was not present for the awards ceremony.

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My media training class where asked to do podcasting. So what is vodcasting??

According to WikipediaVideo podcast (sometimes shortened to vidcast or vodcast) is a term used for the online delivery of video on demand video clip content via Atom or RSS enclosures. The term is an evolution specialized for video, coming from the generally audio-based podcast and referring to the distribution of video where the RSS feed is used as a non-linear TV channel to which consumers can subscribe using a PC, TV, set-top box, media center or mobile multimedia device.”

So my small class which I have been facilitating for media training armed with a digital camera started to take short clips of them to upload onto youtube as part of their training. But because we there are 10 of them… we decided to make just one video and combine smaller ones together. I decided also to add a few pictures I took on my trips around PNG so it gives a PNG flavor to the video. While the final product was not as impressive…. due to lack of better video editing software… I was able to upload something.

There has been an interesting discussion also on Masalai blog about Government TV and my good friend Badira has suggested that digicams and camcorders would be easily accessible to young people who would produce short clips and make content out of it to be aired on TV. So maybe this is the first step towards such activities….a crash course on social media. 

I was one of the many Papua New Guinean die-hards of soccer at the Loyd Robson oval to watch our Woman National Team take on the might of New Zealand ferns. The winner of the two teams will be representing Oceania at the Woman’s World Cup.

We cheered and screamed and shout to push and support our woman… but it seems they wern’t interested or maybe they underestimated their own capabilities. Our gurls seem to have lost the soccer match even before they took the field. There was no desire in the strikers to run at the opponents defenders. When they lost posession they all moved back and no one wanted to force the opponent to make a move. Now I’ve been to bisini and I’ve seen the PMSA teams play…. I note that, its the same tactic being used.

What is wrong with our coaches? Have they lost vision or even creativity? No wonder we get hammered when we play against Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Why can’t we change the style of playing? Why can’t we start doing the simple things correct by play short passes instead of longer one and not going anywhere? Its really disappointing to note that…. the woman’s team where trying to hit the long balls when they don’t have height in front.

Now… I was glad that we didn’t conceed more than 2 goals… but I am utterly disappointed about the style of play that our clubs are adopting… its just not suiting and not working.  And to top off the disappointment is when our girls stating to play alittle dirty when they where 2 goals down.

What happened to “Fair Play” ? If you where beaten by a better side… work harder and try next time…. its embarrasing already to see them kick the opponents and pull their shirts and not even apologising or helping them off the ground.

Lets be creative… look at the south americans… we may learn a thing or two.

Traveling in PNG

Posted: March 8, 2008 in Information, Out n About, Technology

The youth social media training with MediaSnackers have introduced me to a new site called Animoto. This is site is a place where you can upload your pictures and it will create a video of them. It can also factor in music for your folders so you can have a slide-show of pictures with music.

 Anyway… this interesting site has prompted me to upload pictures of my trips to Manus, Goroka, Wewak and Miline Bay so I can share with people. The short video is only 30 secs long as longer versions will costs a few cents.

 Well, hope you enjoy the pictures!

Okay.. okay… I can’t seem to embed Animoto on wordpress…. so I’ll just make a short video and upload to youtube for viewing.

Laters people

Following my post on the Tingim Yut Kompetisen on a national level, https://yutok.wordpress.com/2007/12/05/world-bank-launched-grant-competition/, the global competition is also calling for applications. It’s theme is on sustainable agriculture. I have copied and paste the information for you all to read.

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/OPPORTUNITIES/GRANTS/DEVMARKETPLACE/0,,contentMDK:21617862~pagePK:180691~piPK:174492~theSitePK:205098,00.html

What is DM2008? 
The 2008 Global Development Marketplace competition (DM2008) seeks proposals on the theme of Sustainable Agriculture for Development.Applications are accepted through March 21, 2008 and will undergo rigorous review by more than 200 development experts. About 100 finalists will be announced in June and will be invited to World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC in late September to vie for grants in person at the DM2008 Marketplace event.

This competition offers a unique opportunity to turn your innovative idea for sustainable agriculture in developing countries into reality. If selected, your idea could receive up to US$200,000 in grant funding for implementation over two years. Click here to review the competition brochure.

Proposals are welcome from all development innovators—civil society groups, social entrepreneurs, private foundations, government agencies, academia and the private sector. See the eligibility criteria for more details.

Proposals must address one of the following three sub-themes:

1. Linking Small-Scale Farmers to Input-Output Markets
Farmers are defined broadly to include those who make a livelihood through crops, livestock, agro-forestry, fisheries or aquaculture. Well-functioning agricultural markets can reduce the cost of food and uncertainty of supply, thereby improving food security for both poor and non-poor households. Better markets also result in higher net returns to farmers, derived from reduced post-harvest losses, lower transaction and transfer costs, access to a broader base of consumers and potentially greater value addition. By contrast, inefficient markets and institutional constraints impede growth and lead to welfare losses for smallholders, threatening their competitiveness and often their survival.

Linking small-scale farmers to better markets requires productivity-enhancing change at the farm level that will make their products more attractive to buyers in terms of quality, consistency of supply and price. It also requires institutional innovation in the marketing system that will reduce delays, costs, service gaps, information asymmetries that prevent both availing of opportunities and achieving better market trust and reputation. Ultimately such changes reduce risk.

Under DM2008, proposals for institutional and organizational innovation in marketing systems are sought primarily for: (i) financial and business development services that expand opportunities for more efficient technology adoption and resource allocation by small-scale producers and market agents; (ii) effective producer organizations that can reduce transaction costs and improve efficiency in the marketing chain; (iii) innovations that improve the access of small-scale producers and market agents to transport services, physical markets, telecommunications and electricity in ways that improve supply chain logistics; and (iv) improved sourcing and selling arrangements such as contract farming that will increase access to more lucrative value chains.

2. Improving Land Access and Tenure for the Poor
Land is the key asset for hundreds of millions of poor around the globe who work in agriculture. Land and the resources derived from it is the primary source of not only nutrition and income, but identity, wealth and credit access. Thus, the nature of rights to land and resources (including common property and aquatic resources) and the way in which they are documented and can be exchanged are key determinants for and sustainable agricultural development as well as improved livelihoods for those in the rural sector.

This sub-theme seeks out innovative, low-cost and scalable ways to strengthen access to and improve productive use of land by the poor, especially women. These include: (i) legal aid/awareness campaigns and increasing access to records of land and aquatic rights through private-public partnerships to enhance transparency and reduce corruption; (ii) local resource mapping and registration to develop and codify arrangements for effective use of common property resources in a way that benefits the poor; (iii) decentralized settlement of conflicting land claims in post-conflict settings; (iv) local negotiation to allow regularization of existing occupation by marginal or poor populations or access to land through implementation of reform legislation for land and aquatic rights, or through land markets; and (v) technical and other support to enable those received land through such mechanisms to make the most productive use of it.

3. Promoting the Environmental Services of Agriculture in Addressing Climate Change and Biodiversity Conservation

Agricultural development and environmental protection are closely intertwined. The reliance of agriculture, forestry and fisheries on natural resources means that they can create beneficial and detrimental environmental outcomes. The impact of these activities can be local (agriculture is often the largest water user, for example) as well as global (contributing, for example, up to 30 percent of greenhouse gases). Improvements in agricultural and forestry practices can thus have beneficial impacts at multiple levels: agriculture’s large environmental footprint can be reduced, farming systems made less vulnerable to climate change and agriculture harnessed to promote more global environmental improvement and produce gains locally as well. However, there are often trade-offs between local incentives and global goals.

This sub-theme seeks to elicit innovative systems that ensure local gains to battling the global environmental problems of climate change and biodiversity conservation. Innovations are sought in the following areas: (i) development and production of sustainable biofuels; (ii) methods to scale up payments to ecosystem services; (iii) increased local incentives and benefits to the poor in payment for environmental services schemes; (iv) enhancement of community-level adaptation to climate change in rural areas; (v) reducing the contribution of agriculture and fisheries to greenhouse gases; and (vi) sustainable use and promotion of biodiversity at the local level.

  • Key Dates 

    • March 21, 2008: Deadline for all proposals
    • June 23, 2008: Finalists announced
    • July 28, 2008: Finalists’ proposals due
    • September 24-25, 2008: Marketplace & Knowledge Exchange